Commentary on the Ukraine Controversy by Dr. Don Soeken

Posted Posted in commentary

The Baltimore Sun has published a commentary by Dr. Donald Soeken, founder and president of the Whistleblower Support Fund, who observes “the Ukraine controversy serves as a painful – but also very hopeful – reminder that ‘speaking the truth to power’ is often a crucial step in defending our liberties and protecting the rule of law.”

While working as a U.S. Public Health Service social worker in Washington, D.C., in the late 1970s, Soeken blew the whistle on forced fitness-for-duty psychiatric examinations of federal workers. Those targeted by the exams, he found, included whistleblowers. (more…)

They pay with their peace

Posted Posted in guest authors, in the news, legal

Globally, whistleblowers in government, corporate world and NGOs were murdered, belittled, discredited and dubbed mentally ill. but they managed to shake up things—sometimes.

By Alam Srinivas, India Legal, May 21, 2014. Republished with permission.

REMEMBER Satyendra Dubey? Shanmughan Manjunath? Vijay Pandhare? Or Dinesh Thakur? Don’t feel bad if you don’t. Apart from Dubey, all of them were little-known whistleblowers in government and India Inc., who exposed corruption and vanished after being in the news for a few days. Two of them were brutally murdered; Dubey, after he spoke about the shenanigans in the Golden Quadrilateral highway project, and Manjunath, when he talked about petrol adulteration.

Pandhare and Thakur, however, were successful in their endeavors. The former blew the whistle on Maharashtra’s irrigation scam that led to the resignation of the state’s deputy chief minister, Ajit Pawar. After retirement from the bureaucracy, he joined the Aam Aadmi Party. The latter’s expose on pharma major Ranbaxy Laboratories led to a ban on sale of the firm’s drugs in the US, and investigations in India. The US Justice Department gave him a reward of nearly $50 million.

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