Senate report: CIA lied about torture of detainees

Posted Posted in in the news, legal, reports

[Cross-posted from Whistleblowing Today]  On Tuesday, the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) released an unclassified summary of its classified report on the Central Intelligence Agency’s Detention and Interrogation Program. In a forward, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the committee chair, writes, “it is my personal conclusion that, under any common meaning of the term, CIA detainees were tortured. I also believe that the conditions of confinement, and the use of authorized and unauthorized interrogation and conditioning techniques were cruel, inhuman and degrading. I believe the evidence of this is overwhelming and incontrovertible.” (more…)

Hearing examines health of federal whistleblowing, finds alarming changes

Posted Posted in advocacy, events, in the news, legal, videos
Hearing witnesses Robert MacLean, Dr. Robert Van Boven and Tom Devine. Sept 9, 2014.
Hearing witnesses Robert MacLean, Dr. Robert Van Boven and Tom Devine. Sept 9, 2014.

by Linda Lewis   Sep. 20, 2014

[Originally posted Sep. 18 at Whistleblowing Today]

At a hearing on Capitol Hill last Tuesday, witnesses delivered a combination of good news and dire predictions in testimonies on the state of whistleblowing in the federal government. The hearing, “Examining the Administration’s Treatment of Whistleblowers,” was held September 9 by the Government Oversight and Reform Committee, Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce, US Postal Service and the Federal Census. (more…)

They pay with their peace

Posted Posted in guest authors, in the news, legal

Globally, whistleblowers in government, corporate world and NGOs were murdered, belittled, discredited and dubbed mentally ill. but they managed to shake up things—sometimes.

By Alam Srinivas, India Legal, May 21, 2014. Republished with permission.

REMEMBER Satyendra Dubey? Shanmughan Manjunath? Vijay Pandhare? Or Dinesh Thakur? Don’t feel bad if you don’t. Apart from Dubey, all of them were little-known whistleblowers in government and India Inc., who exposed corruption and vanished after being in the news for a few days. Two of them were brutally murdered; Dubey, after he spoke about the shenanigans in the Golden Quadrilateral highway project, and Manjunath, when he talked about petrol adulteration.

Pandhare and Thakur, however, were successful in their endeavors. The former blew the whistle on Maharashtra’s irrigation scam that led to the resignation of the state’s deputy chief minister, Ajit Pawar. After retirement from the bureaucracy, he joined the Aam Aadmi Party. The latter’s expose on pharma major Ranbaxy Laboratories led to a ban on sale of the firm’s drugs in the US, and investigations in India. The US Justice Department gave him a reward of nearly $50 million.

(more…)

Medicare fraud and how to stop it

Posted Posted in guest authors, legal, strategies

By David E. Haynes

Millions of Americans rely upon the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs for their health care services. In order to fund these critical services, the federal government spends billions each year. In 2013, the federal government spent $772 billion on health insurance programs, nearly two-thirds of which went to Medicare. The funds for Medicare and Medicaid are financed by companies and individuals, who contribute by paying taxes.  (more…)