WSF founder Don Soeken recognized as a social work pioneer

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Dr. Donald Soeken, founder and Executive Director of the Whistleblower Support fund, has been honored as a Social Work Pioneer by the National Association of Social Workers.  Those selected for the honor “have served as steadfast leaders, and their work has had a ripple effect, collectively impacting millions of people over the years through their advocacy, scholarship, publications, and more. ” (more…)

Intelligence veterans praise integrity of journalist Seymour Hersh

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Photo of Seymour Hersh taken September 22, 2017 by Linda Lewis.
Seymour Hersh, 9/22/17. Photo by Linda Lewis.

 

The Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence gathered recently in Washington, D.C., to present an award to investigative journalist Seymour (Sy) Hersh. Hersh revealed in 1969 the massacre of civilians at My Lai (Viet Nam), and exposed torture at Abu Ghraib in 2004. More recently, he challenged the truthfulness of government accounts of an alleged chemical weapons attack in Syria. (more…)

Whistleblowers, Moral Injury, and Endless War; Was Chelsea Manning Motivated By Moral Injury?

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By Peter Van Buren

“My guilt will never go away,” former Marine Matthew Hoh explained to me. “There is a significant portion of me that doesn’t believe it should be allowed to go away, that this pain is fair.”

If America accepts the idea of fighting endless wars, it will have to accept something else as well: that the costs of war are similarly endless. I’m thinking about the trillions of dollars, the million or more “enemy” dead (a striking percentage of them civilians), the tens of thousands of American combat casualties, those 20 veteran suicides each day, and the diminished lives of those who survive all of that. There’s that pain, carried by an unknown number of women and men, that won’t disappear, ever, and that goes by the label “moral injury.” (more…)

Chelsea Manning freed from prison

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Chelsea Manning left Ft. Leavenworth prison today at 2 a.m. Central Time. She had served seven years of an extreme 35-year sentence for whistleblowing, a sentence President Obama commuted just before leaving office.

In prison, the Army private, formerly known as Bradley Manning, struggled for transgender rights and wrote about her upcoming release, “For the first time, I can see a future for myself as Chelsea, I can imagine surviving and living as the person who I am and can finally be in the outside world.”  Upon release, she expressed appreciation for “the wonderful support that I have received from so many people across the world over these past years.” (more…)